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Crazy in Alabama

 

 

 

Okay, this is my second helping of Meat Loaf in as many weeks. What's up with that? He's not gonna be in every movie this winter like Russell Crowe is he? Well, then again, Russell Crowe an Aussie manly-man with that Trash-De-Blanc- mean- old- head biker- dude edge, this guy I can stand more of....yeah, stand against a wall and work my way slowly down his...I digress...

Meat Loaf is the like the cute head biker's fat friend. The one the skanky biker chicks end up with on the ride to Tijuana. Sure, Loaf can act, he's really quite good. I aint ragging on his acting am I? All I have to say is remember when he was this fat sweaty stringy haired rock singer? Well he cut his hair.

Anywho, I have oh, so many positive points to make about this fabulous directorial debut by Mr. Antonio Bandanas (Banderas). What a powerful film. I had thought it was a silly, rompy, comedy, because of that's what the ads seem to want you to think, no? Wrong. This is a deep look at old America and how far we've come as a people of diversified races and thoughts. Sometimes we forget how shortly ago we all looked at one another's skin color and accents and judged neighbors by that? What you say we still do that? Oh, yeah, right. Maybe Crazy will remind us how wrong we are sometimes.

Melanie 'sweet voice' Griffith plays Aunt Lucille. She's just poisoned her old man and is heading to Hollywood to become a star. Enroute she has a few misdemeanor occurrences, takes Vegas by tornado and wears some super chick-babe to the tenth power outfits. Griffith can act. Did you know that? Most people think of her as some bimbo with thick, frankly, over pumped lips.They don't look like no skinny white girl 's lips- then again have gold card, have lips.And her voice is a tad annoying, in that Meg Tilly girlie-girl way,but, hey, it's her voice for criminy sakes. I especially loved her in the James Woods redemption film (after his SUCK bag performance it that piece of steaming swine sheet- Vampires) Another Day in Paradise. Haven't seen it? Stop reading and go rent it. Great huh?

Aunt Lucille is trying hard to have a little taste of life, slice of pie, before all her dreams shrivel up and die. She's had her kids, seven of them, she's been the good little dinner's ready by six wife, and stayed barefoot and pregnant for 52 months of her life. Eeek. Well, it does take place in 1965. That Lucille line alone had me up for three nights...pass the Ortho-Novum.

Her adorable nephew, PeeJoe (short for Peter Joseph, played by Lucas Black) is watching the civil rights movement transpire right before his eyes in his little backward town, just about the same time aunt heads west. Sheriff Doggert(Meat Loaf Aday) has a bit of a white cape with a pointy cap in his closet-if yer gittin my drift. He's determined that his little town shall not be integrated. PeeJoe who's mighty smart for a youngin, witnesses too many awful deeds and has a hard time keeping quiet. Not the norm back then. He's a lot like his wacky aunt in a free spirit way.

When the two simultaneous intertwined stories meet for the last few scenes in Judge Mead's (an ever bizarre Rod Steiger-he creeps me out, and NOT in a Dennis Hopper cool way) court room you'll cheer with all the twists and the absolute bravery young PeeJoe exhibits. Superb acting on all accounts and a fabulous fresh script. Kudos to Banditos (Banderas) for his directing debut, good job old boy. I don't want to forget the great snob job by Elizabeth Perkins. Gosh she's good.

Snack Recommendation: Pecan Pie
Starring: Melanie Griffith, Lucas Black, Dave Morse, Meat Loaf Aday, and Elizabeth Perkins
Directed By: Mr. Melanie Griffith, dreamboat Antonio Banderas

 

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